BUTOH RESIDENCY DAY 2 – Film + Pascal Savy, Aya Ogawa, Mushimaru Fujieda

0 Posted by - January 31, 2019 - Event: Past, Music: past

IKLECTIK AND ZAPT present,

BUTOH RESIDENCY DAY 2: Film Screening + Live performance

Friday 17 May doors 7.30pm – music 8pm  Adv £10 / Door £12 – BUY TICKETS

BUTOH RESIDENCY offers three days of live performances, films and a workshop that see Japanese and European musicians, dancers and artists working together to advance the global recognition of Butoh – both as a uniquely Japanese art form and as a vibrant international platform for communicating in or beyond all languages. Collaborating artists include pianist and vocalist Aya Ogawa and dancer Mushimaru Fujieda from Japan;  Butoh-Techno from Poland, French electronic musician Pascal Savy and, on film, performances by the late Sapporo based dancer Yoko Muronoi.

Part One: a film show of rare footage paying tribute to the late Sapporo based dancer Yoko Muronoi (1959–2017), whose work included performances in the UK with her musician partner Ikuro Takahashi (as Anoyonodekigoto). Plus a film-in-progress of Yoko Muronoi in performance by London based artist Holly Warburton.

Part Two: Dancer Mushimaru Fujieda performing to sound by Pascal Savy and Aya Ogawa

Pascal Savy is a French sound artist and performer based in London. He started making music in the late nineties influenced by early techno and experimental electronic music. Over the last decade he has explored sparser and calmer territories, often reflecting on time, presence and the elusiveness of reality. In parallel to his interest in more minimal and quiet music, he has been heavily influenced by the writings of cultural and political theorist Mark Fisher and has in consequence explored more reactive and politically charged terrains. His recent album ‘Dislocations’, released on Experimedia in May 2018, was conceptualised and articulated around the concepts and ideas developed in ‘Capitalist Realism’ in which Fisher surveys and analyses the symptoms of our current cultural and political malaise.